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E-10 Petrol - Will my Car be okay?

Later this Year the UK government is changing the current standard fuel E5, into the new 'environmentally friendlier' E10.

This change will be occurring in the next few weeks so we've put together some question and answers for you.


What is E10?

E10 is petrol that contains up to 10% renewable ethanol, helping to reduce carbon monoxide emissions associated with petrol vehicles. It's being introduced to tackle climate change.


In Brazil, cars can run on pure ethanol fuel called E-100, but the UK has yet to adopt this practice, and likely won't before the 2030 ban on ICE vehicles.


But what's the point?

It's all in the name of the environment. As ethanol is renewable and derived from plants, just using 5% less unleaded petrol will cause a huge shift in the quantity of fossil fuels needed to power our cars.

The department for Transport claims this shift will cut carbon emissions by 750,000 Tonnes per year.


What about my Car?

Petrol Engines built after 2011 should accept E10 with no issues, but it won't be compatible with older vehicles. If your car is not compatible, it could damage the engine so if you're an instructor with a car 10 years old or more, you likely won't be able to use E10, so be careful!


The government has actually launched a website to check if your vehicle is compatible, you'll need to know the make, model, engine size and year of manufacture to use the site.


https://www.gov.uk/check-vehicle-e10-petrol

All the petrol cars on contract with CA cars shouldn't be effected by this change.


Can I mix E5 and E10?

Yes, that should be fine.

The RAC even suggests those who drive older cars which have accidentally used E10, should rectify the mistake by topping up the engine with E5 as soon as possible after a 3rd of a tank is used.



Can I still use E5 if I choose?

Yes, E5 will still be supplied under the "super" heading at most large filling stations.


Are there any negatives of E10?

Well, Nothing is plain sailing. There are reports that E10 is a less stable fuel, meaning if your car has been left undriven for a while, it may be harder to start.


Other motor industry experts have suggested that E10 is less efficient than it's E5 counterpart. Meaning the vehicle will burn the fuel up quicker, reducing MPG and causing drivers to fill up more.